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10 films to watch this December

films Stephen Spielberg takes on legendary musical West Side Story, Spider-Man is contending with the multiverse and Denzel Washington and Frances McDormand are in a spooky Shakespeare adaptation.

(Credit: Niko Tavernise/ Netflix) films
(Credit: Niko Tavernise/ Netflix)

Don’t Look Up films

People are films often slow films to react to a cataclysm, whether it’s a climate emergency or a global pandemic – and it was this tendency that prompted Adam McKay (The Big Short, Vice) to make his new satire, Don’t Look Up.

Jennifer Lawrence and Leonardo DiCaprio play two astronomers who have calculated that a “planet killer” comet is going to smash into the Earth, killing everyone. But the US president (Meryl Streep) is just one of the many people who refuse to face the facts. The rest of the all-star cast includes Rob Morgan, Jonah Hill, Timothée Chalamet and Ariana Grande. “It’s not the most high-concept bizarre idea,” McKay told The New York Times, “the idea of a disaster movie in which people don’t necessarily believe that the disaster is coming. It goes back to the trope of the mayor from Jaws… I call it a dark comedy.”

However, the US president (Meryl Streep) is only one of the many individuals who will not acknowledge the obvious issues.

Individuals are films frequently lethargic movies to respond to a disaster, regardless of whether it’s an environment crisis or a worldwide pandemic – and it was this propensity that provoked Adam McKay (The Big Short, Vice) to make his new parody, Don’t Look Up.

However, the US president (Meryl Streep) is only one of the many individuals who won’t acknowledge the obvious issues. The

In selected cinemas from 10 December, and on Netflix from 24 December

Nonetheless, the US president (Meryl Streep) is just one of the numerous people who will not recognize the conspicuous issues. The

(Credit: Warner Bros.)
(Credit: Warner Bros.)

The Matrix Resurrections films

Almost two decades after The Matrix Revolutions rounded off the Matrix saga – or so it seemed – it’s time to take the red pill once again. The story is that Neo (Keanu Reeves) has been living as plain old Thomas A Anderson, with no memory of his heroics as a robot-bashing, kung-fu-kicking messiah, and no knowledge of his relationship with Trinity (Carrie-Anne Moss). Then, of course, everything changes. A few notes of caution: this is the first Matrix film to be directed by Lana Wachowski without  films  her sister Lilly, and two of the series’ best actors – Laurence Fishburne and Hugo Weaving – aren’t returning. Still, the action-packed trailer looks suitably eye-popping, and, thanks to Mark Zuckerberg, virtual reality and the metaverse is a hot topic once again.

Taking everything into account, the action squeezed trailer looks fittingly eye-popping, and, appreciation to Mark Zuckerberg, PC produced reality and the metaverse is a fascinating issue to be sure.

Very nearly twenty years after The Matrix Revolutions adjusted the Matrix adventure – or so it appeared – it’s an ideal opportunity to take the red pill by and by.

Released internationally on 22 December

All things considered, the activity pressed trailer looks appropriately eye-popping, and, gratitude to Mark Zuckerberg, computer generated reality and the metaverse is an interesting issue indeed.

Practically twenty years after The Matrix Revolutions changed the Matrix experience – or so it showed up – it’s an optimal chance to take the red pill eventually.

(Credit: Niko Tavernise/ Twentieth Century Fox)
(Credit: Niko Tavernise/ Twentieth Century Fox)

West Side Story

The original 1961 film of West Side Story films , directed by Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins, is renowned as one of the finest Hollywood musicals ever made. A New York-set update of Romeo and Juliet, it was the biggest box-office hit of the year, and went on to win 10 Oscars, including best picture. Why, then, should anyone watch a new take on the same material? Well, one answer is that this West Side Story is directed by Steven Spielberg. Another answer is that Stephen Sondheim, who wrote the lyrics to Leonard Bernstein’s music, has given it his seal of approval. “It’s really terrific,” he said on

Why, then, at that point, would it be advisable for anyone to watch another interpretation of a similar material?

The Late Show with Stephen Colbert.  Spielberg and Kushner really, really nailed it.”

The Ricardos shows what happened when one paper accused Lucille (Nicole Kidman) of being a Communist and one more charged Desi (Javier Bardem) of having unlawful connections, comparably as a few planned to start rehearsing a scene of I Love Lucy.

Released internationally on 10 December

(Credit: Prime Video)
(Credit: Prime Video)

Tangerine and The Florida Project chief Sean Baker might have found his most improbable hero so far in Red Rocket, one more real cut of hard-scrabble American life.

The Ricardos shows what happened when one newspaper blamed Lucille (Nicole Kidman) of being a Communist and one more charged Desi (Javier Bardem) of having illicit relationships, similarly as two or three was going to begin practicing a scene of I Love Lucy.

Tangerine and The Florida Project boss Sean Baker may have found his most unrealistic saint so far in Red Rocket, another genuine cut of hard-scrabble American life.

Being The Ricardos

I Love Lucy was a phenomenon, watched by tens films of millions of Americans every week in the 1950s. If that weren’t unusual enough, the sitcom’s stars, Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz, were married – and they owned the studio where the series was filmed. But they had their problems. Written and directed by Aaron Sorkin (The West Wing, The Social Network), Being

The Ricardos shows what happened when one tabloid accused Lucille (Nicole Kidman) of being a Communist and another accused Desi (Javier Bardem). of having affairs. just as the couple was about to start rehearsing an episode of I Love Lucy.

Released on 10 December in the US, and on Prime Video from 21 December

(Credit: Neon)
(Credit: Neon)

Flee films

It’s difficult to envision a more significant film, however Flee films doesn’t simply do the crucial occupation of refining exiles, it likewise kicks off something new as a narrative:

In this heart-wrenching Danish documentary, Jonas Poher Rasmussen interviews his friend Amin about his traumatic experiences as an Afghan refugee. Amin remembers his years as a child in Kabul, his family’s flight from the Taliban, his soul-crushing limbo in Moscow, and his unbearably grim dealings with the human traffickers who took him to Denmark. It’s hard to imagine a more important film, but Flee films doesn’t just do the vital job of humanising refugees, it also breaks new ground as a documentary:

Rasmussen has made a film in which comic strip-style animation is used for Amin’s memories, and charcoal etchings are used for his fears and nightmares. “Rasmussen’s miraculous memory piece… gently mines the depths of its subject’s journey with eloquence,” writes Tomris Laffly in Harper’s Bazaar. “A feat of humanistic filmmaking, this is a movie we will be celebrating all through next year’s awards season and talking about long after.”

Released on 3 December in the US

(Credit: Simon Rex/ A24)
(Credit: Simon Rex/ A24)

Red Rocket films

Tangerine and The Florida Project boss Sean Baker may have found his most fantastical saint so far in Red Rocket, another authentic cut of hard-scrabble American life.

“It’s a pleasure to put yourself in Baker’s capable hands,” says David Rooney  films  in The Hollywood Reporter, “as he ambles through his loose story with its affectionate, slyly humorous character observations and immersive sense of place.”

Tangerine and The Florida Project chief Sean Baker might have found his most far-fetched hero so far in Red Rocket, one more legitimate cut of hard-scrabble American life.

Released on 10 December in the US

 

The Lost Daughter

Olivia Colman has already won one Oscar (for The Favourite) and been nominated for another (for The Father). Don’t be surprised if she gets a third nomination for The Lost Daughter, Maggie Gyllenhaal’s directorial debut.

Olivia Colman has at this point won one Oscar (for The Favorite) and been assigned for another (for The Father).

Olivia Colman has effectively won one Oscar (for The Favorite) and been named for another (for The Father).

In limited US cinemas on 17 December, and on Netflix from 31 December

(Credit: Alison Cohen Rosa/ A24)
(Credit: Alison Cohen Rosa/ A24)

The Tragedy of Macbeth

 

For the first time in decades, Joel Coen has made a film without his brother Ethan, but he does have a worthy new collaborator: Shakespeare.

Coen is hardly the first director to tackle Macbeth.

 

including Denzel Washington and Frances McDormand (Coen’s wife) as Macbeth and Lady Macbeth.

It’s a creepy, bone-shaking triumph.”

Released on 25 December in the US and Denmark

(Credit: Kerry Hayes/ 20th Century Studios)
(Credit: Kerry Hayes/ 20th Century Studios)

Nightmare Alley films

Instead of a femme fatale, I have three very strong female figures and an homme fatale.”

Released on 3 December in India, and on 17 December in the US

Rather than a femme fatale, I have three extremely amazing female figures and a homme fatale.”

(Credit: Sony Pictures/ Marvel Studios)
(Credit: Sony Pictures/ Marvel Studios)

Spider-Man: No Way Home

and Jamie Foxx’s Electro, who battled the Andrew Garfield manifestation.

Now that Marvel’s superheroes have saved the Universe, their next job is obvious:

they have to save the multiverse.

who fought the Andrew Garfield incarnation. And, who knows, he may even bump into Maguire and Garfield themselves. Sounds fun? Errr… well, apparently not. “It’s dark and it’s sad, and it’s going to be really affecting.

You’re going to see characters that you love go through things.

that you would never wish for them to go through.”

Released internationally on 15 December

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